Photo

[Watch] Jordan Mein Blasts Forrest Petz at The Score Fighting Series 7

Are any other MMA savants out there who are just a little curious as to why Dana White, Lorenzo Fertita and the almighty UFC brass have not been like flies to a bbq over the signing of Canadian prospect Jordan Mein? The first time your trusty Flying Knee writers had the pleasue of seeing this kid ply his trade was all the way back in June of 2008 for Canadian promotion Rumble In The Cage. My head trainer at the time, Hollis “Strictly Business” Huggins took the short notice bout against some “18-year-old Canadian Kickboxer” and our team Bad Boyz Boxing & Wrestling made the trip to Lethbridge, Alberta for what we thought would be a nice way to get our leader back into the win column. 20 seconds and one headkick later we had gotten our first taste of Jordan “Young Gun” Mein (if you’re a fan of impressive KO’s you might wanna watch this one.

Fast forward to 2012, and the maple leaf clad mixed martial artist is one of MMA’s hottest prospects outside of the UFC. Riding an astonishing 9-1 clip in his last ten fights, with the only loss a semi-controversial split-decision to D-1 NCAA wrestler Tyron Woodley in an ugly lay-and-pray affair, Mein has cemented his status as well… a bad motherfucker. His run in Strikeforce was nothing short of impressive; stopping fellow vicious strikers Evangelista “Cyborg” Santos and Marius Zaromskis in Fight of the Night performances as well as avoiding the wrestling of Joe “Diesel” Riggs in another win. 

Since the dissolution of Strikeforce last month, Jordan has found himself in somewhat of a fighter’s purgatory; but made the most of his situation last night with another dominant stoppage over a former UFC fighter in Forrest Petz for the main event of The Score Fighting Series' seventh event. Watch the complete fight below, and keep ya' eyes out for Jordan Mein entering into the lion's den that is the UFC's welterweight division sometime in early 2013.

Photo
[Watch] UFC on FOX 5: Henderson vs. Diaz Video Preview
The UFC has released their video preview for their stacked FOX card set for December 8th in Seattle, Washington. It highlights the top 3 fights on the night’s main card: Mauricio Rua/Alexander Gustafsson, B.J. Penn/Rory MacDonald, and the main event between Ben Henderson and Nate Diaz for the UFC Lightweight Championship. Mike Swick and Matt Brown opens the FOX broadcast.
It promises to be a great night of fights, and it’d be really nice if we can survive these next three-weeks without a card-crippling injury. I don’t want to jinx anything, but I cannot recall either Henderson or Diaz ever pulling out of a scheduled fight for any reason.

[Watch] UFC on FOX 5: Henderson vs. Diaz Video Preview

The UFC has released their video preview for their stacked FOX card set for December 8th in Seattle, Washington. It highlights the top 3 fights on the night’s main card: Mauricio Rua/Alexander Gustafsson, B.J. Penn/Rory MacDonald, and the main event between Ben Henderson and Nate Diaz for the UFC Lightweight Championship. Mike Swick and Matt Brown opens the FOX broadcast.

It promises to be a great night of fights, and it’d be really nice if we can survive these next three-weeks without a card-crippling injury. I don’t want to jinx anything, but I cannot recall either Henderson or Diaz ever pulling out of a scheduled fight for any reason.

Photo
[Watch] UFC Primetime: St. Pierre vs. Condit Episode 3
Georges St. Pierre will be making his long awaited return at UFC 154 where he faces interim champ, Carlos Condit in a welterweight title unification. The bout headlines UFC 154 on Saturday November 17 in Montreal, and as it is one of the most highly anticipated bouts this year, the marketing machine behind Zuffa has decided to give it the UFC: Primetime treatment.
As always, the clip goes in-depth on both fighters’ preparation and aptly delves into the story line of how St. Pierre has been recovering from an ACL injury he suffered late last year.
GSP, who is arguably the promotion’s biggest star, has already been featured in multiple UFC: Primetime specials. He currently has the most number of appearances on the show, with this being his 4th bout to be on the spotlight of the popular series.
Watch the last episode of Primetime below, and we’ll see what happens tonight!

[Watch] UFC Primetime: St. Pierre vs. Condit Episode 3

Georges St. Pierre will be making his long awaited return at UFC 154 where he faces interim champ, Carlos Condit in a welterweight title unification. The bout headlines UFC 154 on Saturday November 17 in Montreal, and as it is one of the most highly anticipated bouts this year, the marketing machine behind Zuffa has decided to give it the UFC: Primetime treatment.

As always, the clip goes in-depth on both fighters’ preparation and aptly delves into the story line of how St. Pierre has been recovering from an ACL injury he suffered late last year.

GSP, who is arguably the promotion’s biggest star, has already been featured in multiple UFC: Primetime specials. He currently has the most number of appearances on the show, with this being his 4th bout to be on the spotlight of the popular series.

Watch the last episode of Primetime below, and we’ll see what happens tonight!

Photo

A tune-up fight for Georges St. Pierre may have been a smarter move than a fight with Carlos Condit

Via Brent Brookhouse

I spent a lot of time discussing the fact that I wasn’t a particularly big fan of Georges St. Pierre vs. Carlos Condit. Actually, that’s not right. I’m a fan of the fight, I’m just not a fan of the fight right now.

St. Pierre has been out of the cage since April 30, 2011. When he steps in this Saturday that will be the 567th day since that UFC 129 bout with Jake Shields. To put that in perspective, that’s only 28 days shorter than the 595 days that Frank Mir sat out after the motorcycle accident that nearly ended his career.

I’m not suggesting that GSP’s return is going to look nearly as horrible as Mir’s did, but simply that I have my reservations about bringing a guy back off a year-and-a-half layoff following a significant injury and saying “now, go fight the best possible opponent a your weight.”

In the majority of cases of elite level athletes it takes until the second year after a surgery like GSP’s to recover to something near 100%, and in sports like football or basketball there are situations which allow for the return to be gradual. When Derrick Rose returns to the Chicago Bulls he isn’t going to be on the floor for 40 minutes. They’re going to bring him in and let him test out his knee for shorter shifts until he trusts it and can do all the things he used to do.

While Adrian Peterson is having a freakish season, putting up amazing numbers less than a year after a serious MCL/ACL injury and surgery, he’s far more the exception than the rule. Many elite running backs, wide receivers, defensive ends..etc. talk about having to learn to trust their knee again and not guarding.

Jon Gelber talked about GSP’s recovery in an article at Bleacher Report:

Therapists focus first on hamstrings and then work their way up to strengthening quads. The quads are the first to go, even before surgery, so it’s important to keep up quad strength before and after surgery. The quadriceps are important as stabilizers of the knee, because when they contract, they help keep the tension off the ligaments by keeping the knee aligned. They also help stabilize the ACL from being stressed with sudden lateral movements or change of direction. By nine months to one year, most athletes can get back into their sport.

However, studies have shown that even NFL players only get up to 80% of their original quad strength back one year after ACL surgery.

GSP has done everything right to recover from his surgery. He had a good surgeon, good therapists, and has good genetics. However, an injured knee is never the same as an uninjured knee. Surgeons do their best to bring people back, but sometimes it takes up to one year to get back to playing sports, and even two years before an athlete feels normal, even in professional elite athletes. GSP certainly fits in that category, so the question remains if he is returning too soon.

My worry isn’t that he’s returning too soon, it’s that the fight with Condit might have made more sense were GSP afforded a tune-up fight. I know the whole thing about “no easy fights in the UFC” and that GSP is still the UFC champion so, to some people, that means that anything other than fighting the best possible opponent would be some sort of betrayal of his station in the sport. And I’m also aware that the UFC has missed out big title fights that they’d like to have pursued over the past two years and wanted to cash in on this one.

But we simply don’t know how GSP will feel in the fight and I’d like to see him overcome some of those issues in a more reasonable situation.

No amount of sparring matches the same level of trust and comfort of being in a full fight. In sparring, if you feel concerned about a position or something doesn’t feel right, you can stop at any point, it’s also a lot easier to avoid situations you don’t want to be in during sparring than it is in the fight.

Maybe Georges is 100% and will fight as well as he ever has, he’s a -350 favorite for a reason. But I just would hate to see a loss that comes because GSP was thrown into to a situation with too many adverse conditions just because he was the #1 fighter in the world 18 months and a traumatic knee injury ago.

Photo
Junior dos Santos signs Nike sponsorship deal
UFC heavyweight champion Junior dos Santos is the latest fighter to “Just Do It” and sign a sponsorship deal with Nike.
Dos Santos confirmed the news on Tuesday via Twitter,which was originally reported by Fuel TV.
"I want to share my happiness with you guys because now I’m part of team #NIKE biggest sports brand in the world. It’s an honor to me Thank God," dos Santos tweeted.
The 28-year-old Salvador, Brazil native becomes the third UFC fighter to sign on with the Oregon-based global sports brand, joining middleweight champion Anderson Silva and light heavyweight champion Jon Jones.
The fighter nicknamed “Cigano” is riding a 10-fight win streak. The 15-1 dos Santos returns to action on Dec. 29, when he meets the man he defeated for the title, Cain Velasquez, in a main event rematch at UFC 155 in Las Vegas.

Junior dos Santos signs Nike sponsorship deal

UFC heavyweight champion Junior dos Santos is the latest fighter to “Just Do It” and sign a sponsorship deal with Nike.

Dos Santos confirmed the news on Tuesday via Twitter,which was originally reported by Fuel TV.

"I want to share my happiness with you guys because now I’m part of team #NIKE biggest sports brand in the world. It’s an honor to me Thank God," dos Santos tweeted.

The 28-year-old Salvador, Brazil native becomes the third UFC fighter to sign on with the Oregon-based global sports brand, joining middleweight champion Anderson Silva and light heavyweight champion Jon Jones.

The fighter nicknamed “Cigano” is riding a 10-fight win streak. The 15-1 dos Santos returns to action on Dec. 29, when he meets the man he defeated for the title, Cain Velasquez, in a main event rematch at UFC 155 in Las Vegas.

Photo
Frankie Edgar discusses upcoming title fight with Jose Aldo at UFC 156

It took a pretty wild set of circumstances, but Frankie Edgar vs. Jose Aldo will soon become reality. The former lightweight champion has dropped two straight close decisions to Benson Henderson, and following the August defeat to Bendo, Edgar made the decision to drop to 145. At first he wasn’t going to get an immediate title shot vs. Aldo, but when Erik Koch pulled out of UFC 153 with a knee injury, Edgar stepped up without hesitation. Unfortunately, a motorcycle accident put Aldo out of commission for the rest of the year, but the UFC obviously sees Aldo vs. Edgar is much more marketable and probably competitive than Aldo vs. Erik Koch.
This fight has now been re-scheduled for UFC 156 on Super Bowl weekend, and hopefully 2013 isn’t nearly as injury-riddled as this year. Edgar talked about his fight with Aldo in an interview with MMA Fight Corner:

"I’m going to do it all. I don’t like to go in there saying I’m going to do one thing. I’m a mixed martial artist and I feel I’m well rounded enough to take the fight wherever it needs to be. I think I can stand with pretty much anybody, I think I can wrestle with anybody and I feel I can compete on the floor with jiu jitsu with anybody. He’s definitely a tall task in an opponent, but I just think fighting guys at the caliber fights I’ve had throughout the years has only got me better and I think Jose will do that as well."

As far as Aldo’s vicious leg kicks? Edgar is obviously going to prepare for that, especially after Ben Henderson chopped away at Edgar’s legs in the opening round of their rematch.

"When Benson came out he kind of was throwing a low leg kick, which did throw me off a little bit. But I felt I made the adjustment within that first round, and I feel that rounds two through five he didn’t really catch me with it at all the rest of the fight. I’m sure that’s something Jose is going to pay attention to, being that he’s such a devastating leg kicker, but I’ve been working my Muay Thai and working some things. Like I’ve been saying, this challenge is going to make me step up and address it."

Aldo has proven to be one of the most dominant champions in MMA today. He took the FW title from Mike Brown in the WEC and has defended it successfully 5 times from the WEC, to AldovsFaberFC, to the UFC. It’s arguably Edgar’s toughest test, and for him to win, Edgar says he’s going to push the pace like he normally does.

“It’s tough to really put any chinks in any of these guys armor that are at this high level now. I just think I’m going to have to push him and test his mettle. I think that’s what I do well, I push the pace and that’s what I’m going to have to do in this fight for sure.”

We can’t wait for this fight as a prelude to Super Bowl XLVII. Fans have discussed in the past whether Edgar would drop to 145 or if Aldo would eventually move to 155 so we can get this superfight in motion, and with one of the two outcomes coming to fruition, all we need is these two to deliver at the highest level and provide us a great battle on February 2nd.

Frankie Edgar discusses upcoming title fight with Jose Aldo at UFC 156


It took a pretty wild set of circumstances, but Frankie Edgar vs. Jose Aldo will soon become reality. The former lightweight champion has dropped two straight close decisions to Benson Henderson, and following the August defeat to Bendo, Edgar made the decision to drop to 145. At first he wasn’t going to get an immediate title shot vs. Aldo, but when Erik Koch pulled out of UFC 153 with a knee injury, Edgar stepped up without hesitation. Unfortunately, a motorcycle accident put Aldo out of commission for the rest of the year, but the UFC obviously sees Aldo vs. Edgar is much more marketable and probably competitive than Aldo vs. Erik Koch.

This fight has now been re-scheduled for UFC 156 on Super Bowl weekend, and hopefully 2013 isn’t nearly as injury-riddled as this year. Edgar talked about his fight with Aldo in an interview with MMA Fight Corner:

"I’m going to do it all. I don’t like to go in there saying I’m going to do one thing. I’m a mixed martial artist and I feel I’m well rounded enough to take the fight wherever it needs to be. I think I can stand with pretty much anybody, I think I can wrestle with anybody and I feel I can compete on the floor with jiu jitsu with anybody. He’s definitely a tall task in an opponent, but I just think fighting guys at the caliber fights I’ve had throughout the years has only got me better and I think Jose will do that as well."

As far as Aldo’s vicious leg kicks? Edgar is obviously going to prepare for that, especially after Ben Henderson chopped away at Edgar’s legs in the opening round of their rematch.

"When Benson came out he kind of was throwing a low leg kick, which did throw me off a little bit. But I felt I made the adjustment within that first round, and I feel that rounds two through five he didn’t really catch me with it at all the rest of the fight. I’m sure that’s something Jose is going to pay attention to, being that he’s such a devastating leg kicker, but I’ve been working my Muay Thai and working some things. Like I’ve been saying, this challenge is going to make me step up and address it."

Aldo has proven to be one of the most dominant champions in MMA today. He took the FW title from Mike Brown in the WEC and has defended it successfully 5 times from the WEC, to AldovsFaberFC, to the UFC. It’s arguably Edgar’s toughest test, and for him to win, Edgar says he’s going to push the pace like he normally does.

“It’s tough to really put any chinks in any of these guys armor that are at this high level now. I just think I’m going to have to push him and test his mettle. I think that’s what I do well, I push the pace and that’s what I’m going to have to do in this fight for sure.”

We can’t wait for this fight as a prelude to Super Bowl XLVIIFans have discussed in the past whether Edgar would drop to 145 or if Aldo would eventually move to 155 so we can get this superfight in motion, and with one of the two outcomes coming to fruition, all we need is these two to deliver at the highest level and provide us a great battle on February 2nd.

Photo
Why MMA Fans Should Follow College Wrestling
Via Mike Riordan
The first is to explain why readers should be interested in reading a weekly college wrestling results article that I wrote for Intermat.
The second is to briefly discuss my thoughts on why MMA fans look at the sport from such very different perspectives.
I originally got into MMA as a means of following the competitive careers of some of my favorite college wrestlers, some of whom I have been following since high school. My entry into MMA completely colors the lens I use to view the sport. When I watch MMA, I get the most enjoyment out of watching great wrestlers employ a strategy which utilizes their particular skills in winning fights. This might seem outrageous to many vocal elements in the sport, but the wrestling, to me, is exciting.
It is safe to say that the type of MMA fan we are, is due large in part to how we became fans in the first place. Those that enter into the sport from boxing (and I don’t think there are very many) want to see crisp striking and well executed stand up; they also may relish the fact that MMA can provide match ups against a division’s very best more often than boxing has done in the past.
Those from a kickboxing background, I would assume, appreciate similar elements of the fight as boxing fans. I also think these fans are more likely to have biases toward the European and Asian fighters who are usually possess the strong kickboxing backgrounds. I also suspect that many believe that troops of scantily-clad female dancers and Lenne Hardt screaming as side dishes to fighter entrances are a fundamental portion of any successful martial-arts promotion recipe.
Fans who come to MMA from jiu-jutsu or other submission arts will have greater appreciation for, obviously, submissions and submission-related fighting. These fans are also more likely to exhibit a Brazillian-centric view of the sport, and to have a bit of a chauvinistic outlook, seeing MMA as “their” sport, and those from other disciplines as, perhaps, soiling the sport’s most pristine form.
Lastly, there are the multitudinous fans who come from wrestling entertainment fandom. These fans, and I’m painting with broad brush strokes here, want two things out of MMA. The first is eye-popping spectacle, everything pro wrestling has to offer, except this time, the combatants are really trying to hurt each other. They want to have their cake and eat it to, experiencing the bang boom of a worked event and the raw grittiness of a “shoot” experience. The only problem with this, is their noisy disapprobation when MMA fails to live up to these desires, which is often, can be considerable.
Pro wrestling types also look for another entertainment factor in MMA: great story lines. If Pro Wrestling is great at anything (and I think that is great at a number of things), it is going to any extreme to sell a fight. MMA fans who have jumped over from pro wrestling want to be convinced their is a reason for watching a fight beyond the fact that one guy is the champ and the other the number one contender, or one guy has K-1 level striking and the other guy won a class single A state high school wrestling championship in Mississippi. These fans want a sport that appeals to their emotions and maybe there is nothing wrong with that.
No matter the path we took to get here, we can always broaden our horizons and enrich our MMA fan experience by investing effort into following another one of MMA’s feeder disciplines. Imagine how rewarding it is to see the student athlete you followed during collegiate competition grow up one day to buckle a UFC belt around his waist. There really is nothing like it. I got to experience this with Brock Lesnar,Cain Velasquez, and a few times with Randy Couture; I hope that I can see it again soon with Johny Hendricks. Being a college wrestling fan offers a new way to enjoy MMA. This is a reason why I am trying to expose as much of the MMA public to the splendor that is college wrestling.
MMA aside, I also try to spread word of college wrestling for the sake of the sport itself. I want to share a thing that brings me so much joy; I figure if I can explain to everyone what about college wrestling I find so exciting, then, naturally I’ll convince everyone to love college wrestling as much as I do.
College wrestling offers heavy doses of what every combat sports fan seeks. Each season tells an epic tale filled with drama, excitement and unpredictability. Best of all, It all leads up to a satisfying climax - what I believe is the greatest sporting event held annually on American soil - the NCAA Division One National Championship.
Wrestling and MMA have both benefited greatly from their relationship with each other, but the possibilities of this relationship have only begun to be exploited. For college wrestling and MMA’s partnership to fully actualize its potential, there needs to be much greater overlap in each sports’ most avid followers. This requires open minds, but it also requires accessible information and resources to guide the willing, yet uninitiated, and particularly from wrestling’s side of the equation.
This is where I hope to help. The landscape of college wrestling can be a daunting thing to navigate for those who don’t know their way around. For instance, if a newcomer were to seek to catch up on all that transpired during a week of college wrestling action, they would first have to aggregate the results and then engage in the potentially impossible task of sifting through individual matches in the hope of making sense of their potential implications. within the college wrestling universe. Fortunately, I am doing the sifting for everyone.

Why MMA Fans Should Follow College Wrestling

Via Mike Riordan

The first is to explain why readers should be interested in reading a weekly college wrestling results article that I wrote for Intermat.

The second is to briefly discuss my thoughts on why MMA fans look at the sport from such very different perspectives.

I originally got into MMA as a means of following the competitive careers of some of my favorite college wrestlers, some of whom I have been following since high school. My entry into MMA completely colors the lens I use to view the sport. When I watch MMA, I get the most enjoyment out of watching great wrestlers employ a strategy which utilizes their particular skills in winning fights. This might seem outrageous to many vocal elements in the sport, but the wrestling, to me, is exciting.

It is safe to say that the type of MMA fan we are, is due large in part to how we became fans in the first place. Those that enter into the sport from boxing (and I don’t think there are very many) want to see crisp striking and well executed stand up; they also may relish the fact that MMA can provide match ups against a division’s very best more often than boxing has done in the past.

Those from a kickboxing background, I would assume, appreciate similar elements of the fight as boxing fans. I also think these fans are more likely to have biases toward the European and Asian fighters who are usually possess the strong kickboxing backgrounds. I also suspect that many believe that troops of scantily-clad female dancers and Lenne Hardt screaming as side dishes to fighter entrances are a fundamental portion of any successful martial-arts promotion recipe.

Fans who come to MMA from jiu-jutsu or other submission arts will have greater appreciation for, obviously, submissions and submission-related fighting. These fans are also more likely to exhibit a Brazillian-centric view of the sport, and to have a bit of a chauvinistic outlook, seeing MMA as “their” sport, and those from other disciplines as, perhaps, soiling the sport’s most pristine form.

Lastly, there are the multitudinous fans who come from wrestling entertainment fandom. These fans, and I’m painting with broad brush strokes here, want two things out of MMA. The first is eye-popping spectacle, everything pro wrestling has to offer, except this time, the combatants are really trying to hurt each other. They want to have their cake and eat it to, experiencing the bang boom of a worked event and the raw grittiness of a “shoot” experience. The only problem with this, is their noisy disapprobation when MMA fails to live up to these desires, which is often, can be considerable.

Pro wrestling types also look for another entertainment factor in MMA: great story lines. If Pro Wrestling is great at anything (and I think that is great at a number of things), it is going to any extreme to sell a fight. MMA fans who have jumped over from pro wrestling want to be convinced their is a reason for watching a fight beyond the fact that one guy is the champ and the other the number one contender, or one guy has K-1 level striking and the other guy won a class single A state high school wrestling championship in Mississippi. These fans want a sport that appeals to their emotions and maybe there is nothing wrong with that.

No matter the path we took to get here, we can always broaden our horizons and enrich our MMA fan experience by investing effort into following another one of MMA’s feeder disciplines. Imagine how rewarding it is to see the student athlete you followed during collegiate competition grow up one day to buckle a UFC belt around his waist. There really is nothing like it. I got to experience this with Brock Lesnar,Cain Velasquez, and a few times with Randy Couture; I hope that I can see it again soon with Johny Hendricks. Being a college wrestling fan offers a new way to enjoy MMA. This is a reason why I am trying to expose as much of the MMA public to the splendor that is college wrestling.

MMA aside, I also try to spread word of college wrestling for the sake of the sport itself. I want to share a thing that brings me so much joy; I figure if I can explain to everyone what about college wrestling I find so exciting, then, naturally I’ll convince everyone to love college wrestling as much as I do.

College wrestling offers heavy doses of what every combat sports fan seeks. Each season tells an epic tale filled with drama, excitement and unpredictability. Best of all, It all leads up to a satisfying climax - what I believe is the greatest sporting event held annually on American soil - the NCAA Division One National Championship.

Wrestling and MMA have both benefited greatly from their relationship with each other, but the possibilities of this relationship have only begun to be exploited. For college wrestling and MMA’s partnership to fully actualize its potential, there needs to be much greater overlap in each sports’ most avid followers. This requires open minds, but it also requires accessible information and resources to guide the willing, yet uninitiated, and particularly from wrestling’s side of the equation.

This is where I hope to help. The landscape of college wrestling can be a daunting thing to navigate for those who don’t know their way around. For instance, if a newcomer were to seek to catch up on all that transpired during a week of college wrestling action, they would first have to aggregate the results and then engage in the potentially impossible task of sifting through individual matches in the hope of making sense of their potential implications. within the college wrestling universe. Fortunately, I am doing the sifting for everyone.

Photo
[Article] Cung Le finished Rich Franklin, what now?
Cung Le defied the odds makers who had his opponent Rich Franklin heavily favored to win at UFC Macao: Franklin vs. Le but can the 40-year-old movie actor and part-time UFC fighter continue to defy Father Time?
It only took Le 2:17 to leave Franklin out cold on the Octagon floor, but I expect it will take quite a while for UFC matchmaker Joe Silva to figure out what to do with him from here.
Some pundits are putting together the conventional list of UFC Middleweight contenders for Le to face next. Steven Mehlhausen lists 5 potential foes for Le, (list is Melhausen’s, commentary is mine):
Winner of Alan Belcher vs Yushin OkamiThis fight makes perfect sense if you see Le as an ordinary fighter in his prime, but he’s not. He’s an undersized, 40-year-old. Either Belcher or Okami would justly go into this fight as a heavy favorite. There’s some promotional logic if Belcher wins in booking Belcher vs Le because it would dramatically raise Belcher’s profile while MW champ Anderson Silva is out fighting Super Fights against Georges St. Pierre and/or Jon Jones in 2013, but there’s absolutely nothing in it for Le beyond a pay day.
Jake ShieldsShields would actually be kind of intriguing for Le since he would definitely, desperately trying to take Le down. Could be the fight where Le finally convinces the doubters by showing his wrestling is no joke, but don’t hold your breath.
Brian StannOn the Fuel TV post-fight program Stann repeatedly mentioned how “honored” he would be to face Le. I think it would be a great fight for Stann to build his name against a smaller, older fighter but I don’t see what’s in it for Le except a pay day.
Ronaldo “Jacare” SouzaSee above.
Anderson SilvaOnly if Jones and GSP don’t want to fight Silva. Wouldn’t be fair at all to Michael Bisping, Chris Weidman, or Alan Belcher, but business is business and other than Bisping, no one else in the division is nearly as high profile as Le. Nonetheless, Le doesn’t merit a title shot.
MMA Mania’s Brian Hemminger had a different take, one that’s closer to my sentiments:

I believe that the best next step for Cung Le isn’t a title fight. In fact, I don’t think it’s a fight against anyone. In my opinion, the perfect next step for Le is retirement.
Why not? How many fighters get to go out on top with a huge knockout win in a main event? It’s a dream scenario!
He’s 40 years old. What else does he have to prove? Do you really think he can beat Anderson Silva? He’s not doing straight-to-DVD movies with Jean-Claude Van Damme anymore. He’s finally getting really big roles that will get him paid in a very real way.
Could he keep going? Sure. I just don’t see the point. I like Le as a fighter and as a person too much to see him keep plugging away and possibly tarnishing all that he’s worked for.
He’s earned the right to do that if he wants, but I’d rather see him go out riding the momentum of the biggest win of his life.

I don’t expect Le or the UFC to listen, but I agree that retirement from the cage is the most logical next step for Cung Le.
From Le’s post-fight comments in the Octagon yesterday, Le might be thinking the same thing.
"I love to do martial arts. I love to compete. If I can do it for as long as I live, I’ll do it. But I know my clock is ticking," Le said after the fight.

[Article] Cung Le finished Rich Franklin, what now?

Cung Le defied the odds makers who had his opponent Rich Franklin heavily favored to win at UFC Macao: Franklin vs. Le but can the 40-year-old movie actor and part-time UFC fighter continue to defy Father Time?

It only took Le 2:17 to leave Franklin out cold on the Octagon floor, but I expect it will take quite a while for UFC matchmaker Joe Silva to figure out what to do with him from here.

Some pundits are putting together the conventional list of UFC Middleweight contenders for Le to face next. Steven Mehlhausen lists 5 potential foes for Le, (list is Melhausen’s, commentary is mine):

  1. Winner of Alan Belcher vs Yushin Okami
    This fight makes perfect sense if you see Le as an ordinary fighter in his prime, but he’s not. He’s an undersized, 40-year-old. Either Belcher or Okami would justly go into this fight as a heavy favorite. There’s some promotional logic if Belcher wins in booking Belcher vs Le because it would dramatically raise Belcher’s profile while MW champ Anderson Silva is out fighting Super Fights against Georges St. Pierre and/or Jon Jones in 2013, but there’s absolutely nothing in it for Le beyond a pay day.

  2. Jake Shields
    Shields would actually be kind of intriguing for Le since he would definitely, desperately trying to take Le down. Could be the fight where Le finally convinces the doubters by showing his wrestling is no joke, but don’t hold your breath.

  3. Brian Stann
    On the Fuel TV post-fight program Stann repeatedly mentioned how “honored” he would be to face Le. I think it would be a great fight for Stann to build his name against a smaller, older fighter but I don’t see what’s in it for Le except a pay day.

  4. Ronaldo “Jacare” Souza
    See above.

  5. Anderson Silva
    Only if Jones and GSP don’t want to fight Silva. Wouldn’t be fair at all to Michael Bisping, Chris Weidman, or Alan Belcher, but business is business and other than Bisping, no one else in the division is nearly as high profile as Le. Nonetheless, Le doesn’t merit a title shot.

MMA Mania’s Brian Hemminger had a different take, one that’s closer to my sentiments:

I believe that the best next step for Cung Le isn’t a title fight. In fact, I don’t think it’s a fight against anyone. In my opinion, the perfect next step for Le is retirement.

Why not? How many fighters get to go out on top with a huge knockout win in a main event? It’s a dream scenario!

He’s 40 years old. What else does he have to prove? Do you really think he can beat Anderson Silva? He’s not doing straight-to-DVD movies with Jean-Claude Van Damme anymore. He’s finally getting really big roles that will get him paid in a very real way.

Could he keep going? Sure. I just don’t see the point. I like Le as a fighter and as a person too much to see him keep plugging away and possibly tarnishing all that he’s worked for.

He’s earned the right to do that if he wants, but I’d rather see him go out riding the momentum of the biggest win of his life.

I don’t expect Le or the UFC to listen, but I agree that retirement from the cage is the most logical next step for Cung Le.

From Le’s post-fight comments in the Octagon yesterday, Le might be thinking the same thing.

"I love to do martial arts. I love to compete. If I can do it for as long as I live, I’ll do it. But I know my clock is ticking," Le said after the fight.

Photo

[Watch] UFC Primetime: St. Pierre vs. Condit - Episode 2

Canadian welterweight kingpin and top pound-for-pound fighter Georges St. Pierre will be making his long awaited return at UFC 154 where he faces interim champ, Carlos Condit in a welterweight title unification bout. The fight headlines UFC 154 on Saturday November 17 in Montreal, and as it is one of the most highly anticipated bouts this year, the marketing machine that is Zuffa has decided to give it the UFC: Primetime treatment.

One more episode is set to air this coming Friday will come in the following weeks, and in case you missed it, you can watch the first episode from this series here.

As always, the clip goes in-depth on both fighters’ preparation and aptly delves into the story line of how St. Pierre has been recovering from an ACL injury he suffered late last year.

GSP, who is probably the promotion’s biggest star, has already been featured in multiple UFC: Primetime specials. He currently has the most number of appearances on the show, with this being his 4th bout to be on the spotlight of the popular series.